Dear Barry Scammell

Recently Edmonton’s auditor cited the need to properly prepare before going to tender.
In 86 tenders reviewed for projects from the period of January 2015 to October 2016 it was found 83% of the time “addenda” or additional clarification was added; in 16 cases clarification was required more than five times. Previous audits had prompted new training for city staff on bid process and contract management in early 2017 so some of the auditor’s recommendations have already been implemented with those remaining to be adopted by spring of next year.

Dear Barry Scammell,

Last month you had asked me the questions below, through my website, but you left no means to contact you. My team could not find you on canada411.com and there are three possible choices for "Barry Scammell" on Facebook. So, I hope you are monitoring my website and come across this. ~Shelley


 

I am undecided in the Ward 2 election so far. I would like to know Shelley's position on 3 issues which are key to Edmontonians:


1) City of Edmonton municipal taxes

Several people have told me they run their households in a fiscally conservative manner including incurring the good debt of a mortgage to finance the purchase of their residence. They have expressed they would appreciate the municipal government running the city the same way. They want the City to stick to the basics of policing, fire rescue, public transit and snow clearing and to do them efficiently. Others have shared that they understand that infrastructure needs to be replaced; however, they have a hard time understanding why their hard earned property tax dollars go to non-essential projects that they feel should be left to the private sector.

2) Photo radar

My position on photo radar is that having been on the receiving end of a couple of photo radar fines – my memory of this kicks in when I travel the roads where the incidents occurred and my general observance of speed limits.
I also have a 10 kilometre per hour rule to drop my speed when we have inclement weather and road conditions that warrant this.

It is important to know that the revenue generated does not go into general revenue.
15% of the fine goes to Victim Services.
Some traffic safety improvements made through the fines paid also occur:
- left turn phases to reduce collisions
- pedestrian amber flashers at pedestrian crossings to improve pedestrian safety
- driver-feed back signs to let drivers know if they are speeding; one message that I have seen is "Slow Down" – this is important because speed determines the severity of a crash.
The sites selected have to do with high collision areas, citizen complaints and for safety purposes, in school and construction zones.

The implementation of the 30 km/hr school zones is to draw to attention of the driver for the need to be extra cautious in these areas.

The statistics are bearing out since the implementing of the lowered speed limits around the elementary schools there has been a decrease of incidents in these zones.

The provincial government is currently reviewing how municipalities use photo radar as its intended role is enforcing traffic safety.

The province currently allows photo radar in high collision areas and in places with high pedestrian traffic.
The more controversial allowed use is in places where there is high frequency of speeding. Some would argue this occurs because the posted speed limit is lower than the safe speed of traffic flow on the roadway.
It is my understanding information is being compiled on how photo radar locations are chosen and on traffic statistics.

I would also ask for a review of road classifications; with the input from citizens on the appropriate speed for the safe flow of traffic.

3) City of Edmonton administration and management of major projects

We have been told the two year delay in the completing of the Walterdale Bridge was caused by a combination of the project’s structural complexity, wait times for materials and environmental concerns.

There was the delay to the completion of the 102 Avenue Bridge and Thales Canada is upgrading software to get the NAIT line trains and the old Capital line trains to interact properly. Currently the trains are running at full speed but not full frequency to achieve the optimal performance from the signaling system.

Myself and a lot of the residents I have spoken with are asking why does this keep happening and what steps are being taken to stop this from reoccurring again?

I believe it was reported at the last Council meeting that the Groat Road bridge over the North Saskatchewan River project is both 10 per cent over budget and 10 per cent behind schedule because officials provided an initial estimate on relatively little design; however, a new system will see projects undergo much more detailed design before a budget goes to council for approval.

Recently Edmonton’s auditor cited the need to properly prepare before going to tender.
In 86 tenders reviewed for projects from the period of January 2015 to October 2016 it was found 83% of the time “addenda” or additional clarification was added; in 16 cases clarification was required more than five times. Previous audits had prompted new training for city staff on bid process and contract management in early 2017 so some of the auditor’s recommendations have already been implemented with those remaining to be adopted by spring of next year.

Through my involvement with the Kensington Community League I was instrumental in several large capital projects being completed; the latest was the $500,000 Spray Park installed in the spring of 2015.

In each case the costs of the project were determined and the funding secured utilizing municipal and provincial grants before the projects proceeded.

I believe there is a tremendous value in having worked on capital projects from the beginning of determining needs, the reviewing of bids and contracts, to their successful completion.

 

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